In the News

In the News is a collection of news stories about aging and disability issues, as well as news stories about ACL and ACL programs.

All of these links ultimately take you to external news websites. The information in the articles does not necessarily reflect the positions of ACL or the federal government, and ACL does not endorse the content of the articles or the publishing organizations. 

September 24, 2021
Kaiser Health News (September 24) Low Wages and Pandemic Gut Staffing Support for Those with Disabilities
September 23, 2021
The AP (9/23) reports Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf’s (D) “administration became so concerned about how three cases of neglect or abuse of older people were handled in Philadelphia that it is ordering improvements at an agency there, but officials are refusing to disclose what happened to those three people, or whether they are alive.” The Aug.
September 23, 2021
CDC Director Overrules Advisory Panel To Broaden Recommended Use Of Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine Booster Shots For Key Groups. The New York Times (9/23, Mandavilli, Mueller) reports CDC Director Dr.
September 23, 2021
In an opinion piece for the New York Times (9/23), Mia Ives-Rublee, Director of the Disability Justice Initiative at the Center for American Progress, says that “as Congress debates President Biden’s ‘Build Back Better’ agenda and negotiates a $3.5 trillion spending bill, at least one crucial part of the bill is being weakened.” Ives-Rublee continues, “The House Energy and Commerce Committee cut Mr.
September 23, 2021
Parents Of Children With Disabilities Reportedly “Crushed” By Opposition To Masks In Schools. The New York Times (9/23, Green) reports that “the opposition to masks has been particularly crushing for parents...who see in-person schooling as a lifeline for their children with disabilities.” Students with disabilities “have been among the most underserved during the pandemic but also sometimes face a higher probability that going to school could make them seve
September 23, 2021
In a piece for STAT (9/23), Daniel George, an associate professor of Humanities and Public Health Sciences at Penn State College of Medicine, and Peter Whitehouse, a professor of Neurology at Case Western Reserve University, write that “dementia rates have actually fallen in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, France, Sweden and the Netherlands over the past decade even though biotechnology continues to come up short.” They propose “that looking at dementia
September 23, 2021
Legislation In Massachusetts Aims To Overhaul Leadership Of Veterans’ Homes Following Deaths Of Residents Due To COVID-19. The Boston Globe (9/23, Stoico) reports, “State legislators unveiled a new bill Thursday that aims to address the pitfalls in leadership and oversight of state-run veterans’ homes, more than a year after 76 elderly veterans died in a COVID-19 outbreak at the Soldiers’ Home in Holyoke.” Massachusetts “also runs a Soldiers’ Home in Chelsea
September 22, 2021
Forbes (9/22, Gleckman) contributor Howard Gleckman writes, “The shortage of staff in long-term facilities and home care agencies has gone from a problem to a crisis.” Gleckman writes, “A new industry survey reports that only 1 percent of nursing homes and 4 percent of assisted living facilities (ALFs) say they are fully staffed, while 89 percen
September 22, 2021
The Washington Post (9/22, Knowles) reports, “Long-feared rationing of medical care has become a reality in some parts of the United States as the delta variant drives a new wave of coronavirus cases, pushing hospitals to the brink.” Some states have implemented “crisis standards of care,” which are intended to “give health-care workers last-resort guidance to make potentially wrenching decisions,” but “people disagree on the best calculus.” Some scholars “worry that

Last modified on 05/21/2020


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