In the News

In the News is a collection of news stories about aging and disability issues, as well as news stories about ACL and ACL programs.

All of these links ultimately take you to external news websites. The information in the articles does not necessarily reflect the positions of ACL or the federal government, and ACL does not endorse the content of the articles or the publishing organizations. 

November 22, 2021
AARP (November 22) 6 Ways to Overcome Social Isolation During Another COVID Winter As pandemic persists, staying connected to others is essential to physical and mental well-being.
November 22, 2021
Pandemic Studies Bolster Case For Smaller, Non-Traditional Nursing Homes. The Next Avenue (11/22, Baker) reports the coronavirus pandemic may accelerate calls for nursing home reforms that advocates have supported “for more than 20 years.” A study in the Journal of the American Medical Directors Association found that smaller and non-traditional nursing homes had “better outcomes than traditional NHs in numerous areas,” including “lower rates of COVID-19 and
November 21, 2021
ABC News (11/21, Alfonseca) reports that people with disabilities “are disproportionately victims of violent crime and victimization in the United States, according to new data released by the Bureau of Justice Statistics.” And the “frequency of these crimes is also increasing, according to the data, though activists don’t seem to know why.” The
November 20, 2021
Washington Post (November 20) How new monitoring systems keep a close watch on older people Weathers-Jablonski installed a monitoring system with nine motion sensors around the house — in her mother’s bedroom, the hallway, kitchen, living room, dining room and bathroom and near three doors that led outside. They connected to an app on her phone, which sent activity alerts and provided a log of her mother’s movements.
November 19, 2021
Bloomberg Law (11/19, Pazanowski, Subscription Publication) reported, “A New Jersey regulation governing expanded Medicaid eligibility for aged, blind, and disabled people is invalid because it doesn’t follow the law’s requirement to adjust for family size when determining their income eligibility, the state’s top court said.” The New Jersey Supreme Court said, “New Jersey’s Medicaid agency improperly denied benefits to two people arguably eligible under the expansion
November 19, 2021
Washington Post (November 19) For seniors using tech to age in place, surveillance can be the price of independence To age in their own homes, seniors are juggling being watched with being on their own.
November 19, 2021
The Portland (OR) Business Journal (11/19, Hayes, Subscription Publication) reports, “Disability rights advocates are pushing Oregon’s Medicaid program to change how it decides which treatments to cover in order to ensure that people with disabilities are not discriminated against and denied services.” The request by Disability Rights Oregon “comes as the state prepares its application to the federal government to renew its Medicaid waiver for another five years.” The
November 19, 2021
Disability Scoop (11/19, Heasley) reports, “The vast majority of students with disabilities have been offered no compensatory services, a new survey finds, despite deep concerns from parents about learning loss and regression amid the COVID-19 pandemic.” Only “8% of students with disabilities have been offered any compensatory services from their school, according to findings from a national survey conducted by the Council of Parent Attorneys and Advocates, or COPAA”
November 16, 2021
Tennessee School District Eliminates Mask Mandate Against Legal Advice. The Tennessean (11/16, Exum) reports Tennessee’s “Williamson County Schools Board of Education voted in favor of removing its district-wide mask mandate Monday at its November meeting.” The removal was “based on low COVID-19 case counts across the district,” but “was made against the recommendation of litigation counsel Lisa Carson and district superintendent Jason Golden, who both met w
November 16, 2021
The Wall Street Journal (11/16, Petersen, Subscription Publication) reports baby boomers looking for mental healthcare are finding out when they turn 65 that locating a therapist who takes Medicare can be more difficult than finding one who takes private insurance. What used to be a small copay turns into a $190 charge for a session as a result. CMS is mentioned in this story.

Last modified on 12/01/2021


Back to Top