In the News

In the News is a collection of news stories about aging and disability issues, as well as news stories about ACL and ACL programs.

All of these links ultimately take you to external news websites. The information in the articles does not necessarily reflect the positions of ACL or the federal government, and ACL does not endorse the content of the articles or the publishing organizations. 

January 24, 2019
In “Health & Science,” the Washington Post (1/24, Johnson) reports on advances in sleep research, mentioning a recent study that found sleep deprivation may increase the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. The article highlights some of the discoveries made about sleep in recent decades.
January 24, 2019
Washington Post (January 24) The ‘Golden Girls’ trend could be a golden opportunity for retirees facing isolation
January 24, 2019
Disability Scoop (1/24, Diament) reports that a new bill was introduced in Congress that could “ensure that people with disabilities who are eligible for institutional care would have the right to access those same services in their own homes, if they choose.” Supporters of the legislation say it would strengthen the Americans with Disabilities Act and bolster the Supreme Court’s ruling from Olmstead v. L.C.
January 24, 2019
Wall Street Journal (January 24) Scamming Grandma: Financial Abuse of Seniors U.S. banks reported 24,454 suspected cases of elder financial abuse to the Treasury Department last year, more than double the amount five years earlier.
January 23, 2019
NPR (1/23, McKim) reports on its website that the Food and Drug Administration plans to ban a device that can be used to administer electric shocks to special education students. The article notes that Judge Rotenberg Educational Center in Massachusetts is “the only school in the country that shocks its students with disabilities to control their behavior,” and there is an ongoing debate about the safety, effectiveness, and ethics of us such a device.
January 23, 2019
Stan Gornicz writes for Next Avenue (1/23) on the process of making one’s house “ready to age in place.” Gornicz cites an AARP finding “that almost 90 percent of people over 65 want to stay in their residences for as long as they could,” and notes that the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) and AARP “developed the Certified Aging-In-Place Specialist (CAPS) program” to identify professionals who can “fine tune the concept of universal design – eliminating barr
January 23, 2019
The Washington Post (1/23, Wootson) reports a male nurse has been charged by police in Phoenix, Arizona for allegedly sexually assaulting a female resident of a healthcare facility less than a month after the gave birth. The arrested “man was identified as Nathan Sutherland, 36, a licensed nurse who was at least partly responsible for the woman’s care at Hacienda HealthCare.”
January 22, 2019
Forbes (1/22) contributor Bruce Japsen writes that “health plans that contract with state Medicaid programs are moving to address social determinants of health by paying for affordable housing, food vouchers to purchase fresh vegetables and education screenings at the doctor’s office.” However, a new report from the Institute for Medicaid Innovati
January 22, 2019
USA Today (1/22, Miller) reports physicians “may be able to predict if someone will develop Alzheimer’s disease up to 16 years before they show symptoms by testing for a certain protein in the blood, new research” indicates.

Last modified on 06/29/2017


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